The Thing

The Thing

By John Carpenter

  • Genre: Sci-Fi & Fantasy
  • Release Date: 1982-06-25
  • Advisory Rating: 18
  • Runtime: 1h 48min
  • Director: John Carpenter
  • Production Company: Universal Pictures
  • Production Country: United States of America
  • iTunes Price: GBP 5.99
  • iTunes Rent Price: GBP 3.49
7.9/10
7.9
From 2,452 Ratings

Description

Horror-meister John Carpenter (Halloween, Escape from New York) teams Kurt Russell's outstanding performance with incredible visuals to build this chilling version of the classic The Thing. In the winter of 1982, a twelve-man research team at a remote Antarctic research station discovers an alien buried in the snow for over 100,000 years. Once unfrozen, the form-changing alien wreaks havoc, creates terror and becomes one of them.

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Reviews

  • Please Put The Extras And 4K On

    1
    By JP QUINN 40
    Please Put The Extras And 4K On Thank You πŸ™‚πŸ‘πŸ»
  • One of my favourite films of all time

    5
    By The Humble Master
    Saw this when I was about 12. Never seen anything like it before or since
  • One of the best Films ever…..

    5
    By Old Skool Trekkie
    Tension, incredible effects and a simplicity in acting from all the cast make this perhaps THE best Horror. Kurt Russell (again) nails his role (as does everyone). Everything works (even the dark comedy) and make this film everything the prequel was not. Class...
  • great film

    5
    By Jimmyboy41
    one of carpenters best don't know why they bothered remaking this as the original is far superior great cast and special effects
  • Outstanding Movie

    5
    By Cravex
    Tense, and with special effects that stand up brilliantly today. Wonderfully tense and with a sense of how alone the characters are out in the Arctic. A true classic sci-fi horror
  • Still great

    4
    By hoverjumper
    Watched this again recently after it was voted in the top 10 sci-fi movies of all time by Skeptics Guide to the Universe Podcast. Still an enjoyable movie and worth watching again. Special effects look a bit dated, but this doesn't detract from a well told story with plenty of tension and scares!
  • A milestone in filmmaking

    5
    By Rr 7
    John Carpenter is one of those directors who should be considered in the same league as directors such as James Cameron, Ridley Scott and Steven Spielberg. What Carpenter delivers here is a powerful, supercharged horror roller coaster on a budget far less than the aforementioned directors are used to exept from when they started out. Carpenter rarely works on movies with large budgets. His best work are on movies of the lowest budgets, this film has been discussed on academic levels on the subject of filmaking. The visual effects for their time were ground breaking. This movie does not deal with people in alien costumes here. This is a genuinely terrifying alien creature trying to survive any way it can which includes infecting earth dwelling creatures by their DNA. The tension the movie creates is second to none where being able to trust is as difficult as trying to remain human. The Ennio Morricone score is strong and adds additional tension which cannot be understated. It is a shame the fully composed score was not used in the finished film. In some deleted scenes you can find some of the unused score. If you get a chance to listen to the score check out the main title theme and a fabulous piece of music composed from the film but never used called 'sterilization'
  • Superb

    5
    By MaxJP86
    This film's only real rival for the best scifi/horror movie of all time is Alien. Visceral & disturbing effects, characters who behave intelligently yet are still doomed, one of the most terrifying 'creatures' committed to film & a pervasive atmosphere of isolation, paranoia & fear make this a must for any horror fan.
  • Close to perfect

    5
    By Sim_saiD
    No dumb blond running around screaming in this film, no cheap scares, or jumps. Just awesome tension and hehe, "you gotta be kidding me!".
  • Best Sci-fi horror ever made

    5
    By Colin Darby
    Don't need to say anything else, except see Rob Ager's analysis of this film on You Tube.

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